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Archive July 2019

The phone number for the Isledon Road day centre has changed.

The new number is 020 7062 9881.

Mental Health Recovery Pathway volunteers

Hours: Minimum 1 day/week 9:30am-5:00pm

Location: London Borough of Islington

Closing date: Ongoing

We are looking to offer volunteering placements with our new Mental Health Recovery Pathway (MHRP) – a mental health provision based across three sites in Islington responding to the mental health needs of Islington residents. It offers two pathways:

  • The Integrated Community Support (ICS), providing day service opportunities for people with Low and Medium Preventative Care Needs
  • The Structured Integrated Support (SIS) for people with Higher and more complex needs.

You will be assisting service users who experience mental distress in one to one and/or in group settings.

We ask for a commitment of at least 1 day a week 9:30 – 5:00 for a full year (+ about 2-3 months for DBS check and induction), though there are plenty of opportunities to volunteer more than one day a week.

If this sounds interesting and suitable to you, please complete the volunteer application form and return with your CV and a letter of interest, indicating

  • why are you interested in volunteering for Islington Mind 
  • whether there is anything specific that you would like to do in your volunteering placement – e.g. facilitate activities, work one-to-one with service users, support our open access drop-in sessions, support service users with completing forms, accompany service users to appointments etc.
  • your availability – e.g. one or more days a week and which days of the week you are available.

Please email all the above application material to:

Ossi.ron@islingtonmind.org.uk

The Islington Mind Enablement Service offers Islington residents who experience mental health problems, the opportunity to work in a focused way through a programme of up to 16 weeks, designed with them to help develop strategies to improve their quality of life and reduce their dependence on statutory services. We also offer one-off sessions of personalised support.

We are looking for volunteers who can support people with activities for at least 3 hours per week. Activities such as:

  • Escorting people to appointments/outings/activities or events
  • Organisational and administrative tasks – help with budgeting; understanding/applying for welfare benefits; letter writing and form filling; arranging activities/appointments; planning the use of other services such as shopping
  • Supporting people to maintain their homes – reporting/organising repairs; organising a move; signposting and referring to services and activities
  • Ad-hoc support

Staff benefits include volunteers receiving 4 days of training and a fortnightly group supervision.

What you will gain from this role:

  • Free accredited Mental Health First Aid training
  • On the job training and supervision
  • Support with professional development
  • Work references provided after completion of one year’s volunteering
  • Travel expenses reimbursed (within London)

How to apply: Please read the Role Description carefully and if you feel you are able to commit to the requirements of the position, we would love to hear from you. Please return the completed volunteer application form, along with a copy of your CV, to ossi.ron@islingtonmind.org.uk

If you have any questions, please email Ossi at ossi.ron@islingtonmind.org.uk or phone 020 3301 9850 

Caroline, who is 10 weeks pregnant, clutches a colourful antenatal zip-file folder from the NHS. It has pregnancy advice written all over it, telling her to eat healthily and stay active. But she is in an unusual position for a soon-to-be mother – she’s a rough sleeper.

The 28-year-old is one of many who have been getting food, but also mental health support at the Soup Kitchen at the American international church on Tottenham Court Road in central London.

The project is the first of its kind, with no other soup kitchen having ever opened up a mental health clinic on site.

Alex Brown, the director of the Soup Kitchen, first made the suggestion. He felt that by giving free mental health support to homeless people you could help them get off the streets.

Michael Brown, a Soup Kitchen trustee and the founder of the advertising company MKTG, helped by setting up a crowdfunding page to raise money for a part-time therapist. They needed £30,000 and it exceeded this target in late 2017. There were further steps to take before launching but they opened their doors with a party last week.

Last week Caroline was being helped by Dr Dobrochna Zajas, a cognitive behavioural therapist. She and her colleague Dr Brett Grellier have been offering specialist therapy, using techniques tailored for those who have been through trauma.

Full story: Guardian

Three in five young people (59 per cent) have either experienced a mental health problem themselves, or are close to someone who has, according to major new research by Mind that shows the sheer scale of the pressures faced by young people.

The survey from the mental health charity also shows that one in seven (14 per cent) young people say their mental health is currently poor or very poor and outlines the breadth of the challenges they face. It also highlights how secondary schools are promoting and supporting their wellbeing.

When it comes to accessing support within school, there were problems with knowing where to go, and then getting the right kind of help. Mind’s survey also found:

  • Almost two in five (38 per cent) of all pupils said they wouldn’t know where to go to access support within school and half (52 per cent) said they wouldn’t feel confident approaching teachers or other school staff if they needed help.
  • Around one in five young people (21 per cent) had accessed support for their mental health within school. Of these, almost one in two (43 per cent) said they didn’t find the support helpful and two in three (63 per cent) said they weren’t involved in decisions made about that support.

In terms of receiving help outside the school gates, less than one in three pupils (28 per cent) who had experienced a mental health problem had used mental health services. This means a huge gap in the numbers of young people needing help and those actually accessing support from the NHS.

Louise Clarkson, Head of Children and Young People at Mind, said:

“We spoke to thousands of young people to try to better understand the scale of poor mental health across secondary schools in England and Wales. There were some really positive findings, with most pupils saying that, on the whole, they thought their schools believed good mental health was important and promoted wellbeing. But we also heard from many young people experiencing problems with their mental health. Despite the high levels of poor mental health among young people, many are not accessing support and those that are aren’t always getting what they need.

“It’s not schools at fault – we know they are under increasing pressure to provide wellbeing support for pupils at a time of rising demand and gaps in NHS mental health services. We know that many are doing the best job they can with limited resources and staff need the right expertise and support from other parts of the system. The Prime Minister’s recent announcement about training for teachers is welcome but it’s only one part of the picture – school staff need to know that if they are starting conversations about mental health with a young person, there are services in place to refer them onto.”

The surveys were carried out as part of a pilot project in 17 secondary schools in England and Wales. Funded by The BRIT Trust and WHSmith, Mind has been working with secondary schools since September to pilot a new approach to improving the mental health of the whole school community, including pupils, all school staff and parents.

Mental health information for young people is available for free from National Mind’s website. Mind is inviting young people from England and Wales to share their views and help better understand the barriers they face to accessing support and what some potential solutions might be. Anyone interested in taking part can click here.

Full story: National Mind

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